The School of the Future

Image courtesy by Sossio Mosca

An international school for a new generation of leaders

“I dreamed a school that teaches that dreaming is the most real thing there is; a school that explains to the new generation of leaders that economy is the art of dreaming.”

It is with this spirit that I decided to found in the 1980s the European School of Economics (ESE), a private business school, of British organization and validation (it is the only Italian entity recognized among the UK Listed Bodies).
Created with the aim of being an international school ready for the current social change which foresees, “a new age of creative leisure, in which creative adventure will prevail over physical movement.”

For this reason, the European School of Economics is a real “ethnic cradle of education.” Focusing on the encounter of different cultures, it has six offices around the world (Rome, Milan, Florence, London, Madrid, and New York) and has always focused on a specific sector: that of economics, finance, and management.

“Our mission is unique: to offer the new generations a different education that shakes up the traditional and rote learning-based Italian educational system, a school of Being, capable of overturning the entire educational system and preparing the cells of a new humanity”.

A student-centered institution, able to enhance the skills of its students and remind them “of their uniqueness, their responsibility, and creativity. Aspects that will allow them to govern themselves first and then the world around them.” The ESE is inspired by Socrates’ Maieutics and by the educational wisdom of the various Greek and Latin masters of the past. Not surprisingly, the Exduco program (a Latin term that originates from the verb ex-ducere, which means “to bring out”, or rather, “to make come out”), allows the students to become teachers themselves.
It has a limited number of students — a maximum of 15 students per class.

The idea of less is more, among other things, during the lockdown period imposed by Covid-19 was translated into ‘small classes big care.’ During those months, in fact, we closed the Campus and continued to do lessons, exams, webinars (with prominent companies) and courses in a totally digital and online way.

Article published in the September 2020 issue of Forbes Italia

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